Instructor Profiles and Classes

Click to download printable Conference Booklet

 

Alissa Barton Mary Berry Anne Cameron
Inga Marie Carmel Peggy Doney Gabrielle (Gabe) Duggan
Joanne Hall Karen Hobbs Yohannah Klingensmith
Lynne Lovett Edgar Miller Suzanne Morgan
Carol Moseley Ellen Smith Mickey Stam
Polly Adams Sutton Susie Taylor Eileen Thompson

 

Alissa Barton

Alissa Barton learned to spin as a child with a drop spindle made from a stick and half a potato. Her fascination with all things yarn has driven her to a career in fiber arts.

Until recently, Alissa owned Knitting Fairy Yarn Studio. The shop closed in April of 2018, due in large part to Alissa’s travel as a nationally recognized knitting teacher. Alissa’s more than 30 years of teaching experience make the “Knitting Fairy” the go-to person for all of the tips and tricks – everything from casting on to binding off, from accessories to sweaters. Nothing thrills Alissa more than finding a new technique or stitch.

One of the original instructors for DFW Fiber Fest, Alissa is considered a “secret weapon” by many in the fiber community who know that they can rely on her to share her knowledge and skills across multiple crafts at a moment’s notice. Her Knitting Fairy patterns have been published in a variety of magazines and many are available on Ravelry.
Alissa has taught classes at guilds, workshops, retreats, and stores all around Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Michigan, and Mexico since 1990. You can find her on Ravelry, Facebook, and Twitter as “KnittingFairy” and as “TheKnittingFairy” on Instagram.

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Mary Berry

Mary Berry owns Fancy Fibers, both a store and artist studio in north Texas, where she teaches spinning, weaving, dyeing, and rug hooking, and sells all the tools, supplies, and equipment that one might want for those arts.

She fell in love with weaving in the early 90’s when she found herself bored with knitting and decided to try something new. Her vast knowledge about fiber has been gained first-hand from the sheep, goats, and alpacas she has raised on the Fancy Fibers Farm. She has written multiple articles and projects for Ply Magazine and Handwoven, and she teaches at fiber festivals nationwide. Her primary goal is to entangle everyone she meets in the web of fiber arts!

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Anne Cameron

Anne Cameron lives in Dallas, Texas and has been weaving for about eight years. She is retired from two professional careers. She stumbled upon hand weaving at a retreat at Holden Village in Washington State, and became passionate about it almost immediately. She loves combining colors, textures, and fibers in unusual ways to create one-of-a-kind wearable art. Anne creates scarves, shawls, garments, and fabric for constructing clothing as well as household linens and other functional textiles.

Anne has received awards for her weaving at juried shows and was chosen as Artist in Residence for three months at the Plano Public Library last year. Her teaching has included people of all ages and even students who speak no English! She is excited to share her love of weaving with other new weavers.

Her weaving looms range from the most simple (rigid heddle) to the complex (multi-harness dobby looms). Anne teaches hand weaving at her home studio and other locations in and around Dallas. Check out her website, TisseDesigns.com, and follow her on Instagram at TisseDesigns

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Inga Marie Carmel

Inga Marie Carmel has been weaving since she was a small child in Sweden. Her mother and grandmother were both weavers, and her great-grandfather was a dye-master. She is a recovering Landscape Architect with a BA from UC Berkeley, and has taught garden design as well as knitting and weaving classes.

Currently, she teaches weaving at The Contemporary Austin Art School and serves on the board and as webmaster for the Weavers and Spinners Society of Austin. She lives and weaves in Austin, Texas, and makes an occasional summer weaving excursion to Saterglantan.
Marie received the Handweavers Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Handweaving, Level 1 in 2016. Her Dukagang Pillow was awarded “Best Home Décor Item” by Handwoven and was published in the September/October 2015 issue. Her article on Overshot appeared in the November/December 2017 issue of Handwoven, and her article on weaving with wire appeared in Weavezine in August of 2009.
Marie enjoys exploring the boundaries of what a loom can do as much as she enjoys the old Swedish textiles that form her cultural heritage, and so one will find wire, electronics, and straw among the linens. She’s a self-described loom geek, fascinated and in love with the loom itself, with which she loves to interface. Her favorite weave structure is one that she’s never woven before. She can be found at ingamarie on Instagram and Weavolution, and at ingamariecarmel.com.

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Peggy Doney

Peggy Doney has always been fascinated with color since her first box of crayons. After 20 years of homeschooling, she wondered what to do with all of the left-over chemistry equipment. The answer came after taking a spinning class with a neighbor. Now she enjoys spinning, knitting, silk fusion, and dyeing.

For many years, she has been discovering color recipes using triad, gradient, and value studies. These studies support her special interest in making accurate recipes that are starting points for matching colors in nature. The yarns Peggy creates celebrate the texture and luster of a wide variety of natural and synthetic fibers and provide amedium to combine those textures with the color she loves. Her skill with the dye pot led to a stint as one of the regular dyers for Treenway Silks.
If there is anything that Peggy enjoys as much as creating with fiber and color, it is sharing that passion with others. From an annual fiber arts gathering in her back yard to teaching workshops for guilds and at festivals like the Taos Wool Festival to one-on-one sharing, she likes to pass on her excitement for fiber and color. Peggy knows all the dyeing jokes, has a herd of wheels and a plethora of dye pots, and now uses her big box of crayons as reference material. She makes her home in Colorado Springs, Colorado with her fiber-enabler husband, Jeff, and two undyed white dogs.

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Gabrielle Duggan — Closing Speaker

Gabrielle Duggan currently is a Visiting Assistant Professor in Fibers at the University of North Texas. She has a Masters of Art and Design from North Carolina State University (NCSU), a Bachelor of Science from Buffalo State College, SUNY, and an Associate Degree in Applied Science from the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.  Gabrielle has worked extensively in the academia world as an Assistant Professor of the Practice at the College of Design at NCSU and a Visiting Lecturer at Georgia State University. She has also conducted workshops in Fibers at NCSU, East Carolina University, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit, and the Contemporary Art Museum of Raleigh, North Carolina.  Gabrielle is represented by AH Arts in New York City and her studio research has been supported by Fellowship and residencies, and grant and exhibition opportunities.

As a Rob R. Dunn Artist in Residence, she collaborated with Biologist Adrian Smith at Smith’s lab in the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences throughout the year of 2017. They located and cast a Pogonomyrmex ant nest in dental plaster as part of an installation in the lab; art and science research developed side by side and in conversation. This collaboration culminated in a presentation at NCMNS’s Science Cafe and an article in SciArt Magazine.

Gabrielle’s other works shown were created working on the TC1 where she will combine traditional overshot patterns with overlays of words, topical mapping lines and looser sections of warp. She uses many techniques including mixed media to create the imaging she desires.

Closing Speaker : “Fiber Work: A Call to Responsibility and Agency”

  • Sunday, June 2 – 11:30 am

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Joanne Hall

Joanne Hall attended the University of Minnesota for her master’s degree in Textile Design in order to pursue her interest in weaving. She taught at the University of Montana and Cal Poly in California.

She started weaving tapestry in 1972 and in 1976, she wrote the book, Mexican Tapestry Weaving. She settled in Montana and opened her tapestry studio. Tapestry was her initial interest in weaving and has always been her emphasis. Her largest tapestry commission was 8 feet by 20 feet and hangs in a hospital in Dallas. Teaching is her other passion, along with a strong interest in Swedish weaving. To help new weavers, she recently wrote two books, Tying Up the Countermarch Loom and Learning to Warp Your Loom.

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Joyce Hazelrig

Joyce Hazelrig has been working with wool since 2008. She is an award-winning fiber artist and felting teacher. She won Living Felt’s Alice in Wonderland International Felting Contest in 2010 with her innovative glow-under-black light Psychedelic Cheshire Cat.

Her whimsical characters and adorable creatures are inspired by myth, fairy tales, and the natural world. She works at Renaissance Festivals in Texas and Oklahoma, and often shows and sells her art at indie craft shows throughout the year. She often processes and dyes her own fiber, buying fleeces and fiber from small family farms. She lives with her hypnotist and musician husband with a cadre of furry animal children in the rural outskirts of charming Bastrop, Texas.

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Karen Hobbs

Karen Hobbs has been weaving since the late 1980’s when an aunt taught her to weave pine needle coil baskets. She has been a multi-media artist ever since, through knitting, book making, and quilting, to name a few. Her love is baskets and brooms and sharing the knowledge gained through years of teaching.

Karen has just released her first book, Swept Away, the Vanishing Art of Broom Making. She has served as President of the Central Texas Basket Guild and Member at Large for the Texas Basket Weavers Association. She was awarded the First Recipient of the Texas Basket Weavers Education Grant 2018, with which she learned more in depth about willow weaving, harvesting, and growing. She is a member of and teaches for the Oklahoma Basket Weavers Guild, the Stateline Basket Weavers, the Texas Basket Weavers Association, and the Texas Gourd Society.

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Yohannah Klingensmith

Yohannah Klingensmith began weaving on a rigid heddle loom when she was ten. At age 13, she apprenticed with Ann Chase of Martha’s Vineyard, where she was living at the time. Using the techniques she learned, Yohannah began weaving and selling placemats, coasters, and runners to neighbors and at craft fairs on the island. Over the next five years, she saved enough to buy her first floor loom and three Corridale sheep. She continues this business to this day, selling custom weaving through the Homestead online store, Homestead Gift Barn, and Homestead Fiber Arts.

Yohannah has taken classes with Jason Collingwood, Becky Ashenden, Joanne Hall, Su Butler, and Jette Vandermeiden.

In addition to rugs and runners, her current weaving pursuit is drawloom weaving, having completed three, three-panel double weave “Pine Tree and Snowball” queen-size coverlets this past year. Yohannah works and teaches weaving at Homestead Fiber Arts, part of the Homestead Craft Village in Elm Mott, Texas, which features award-winning woodworking, blacksmithing, pottery, leather work, and quilting, in addition to fiber crafts. Her classes (averaging 75 per year) range from introductory to advance rigid heddle and floor loom weaving, including a class and seminar at CHT in 2015.

At CHT in 2013, Yohannah was awarded Handwoven Magazine’s “Weaving for the Home” Award of Excellence for her log cabin weft-faced rug. At CHT in 2015, she won third place for her king-size coverlet in the “Functional” class, which she created using the knowledge she learned from Jette Vandermeiden’s drawloom instruction. Yohannah chose a traditional overshot pattern, “Double Orange Peel,” converted it to double weave, then transposed it for the drawloom using 12 pattern shafts and four ground shafts. This 100% cotton coverlet, woven in three perfectly matching panels, is a superb example of drawloom weaving. At CHT in 2017, she won “Best of Fashion Show” for a handwoven wedding dress.

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Lynne Lovett

Lynne Lovett has been sewing for over 55 years, and has been teaching sewing for over 30 years. She has conducted seminars and workshops for handweavers and seamstresses, and has taught Fashion Design and Clothing Construction on the university level. Additionally, her background as a theatrical designer gives her an interesting perspective in fiber art and wearable art. Her focus is on fit, style, and wearable art that is truly wearable.

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Edgar Miller

Edgar Miller is a native Texan from Port Arthur. He has appeared in photographs since 1968 and has taken and developed photographs since 1979. Edgar earned his BFA from Lamar University in 1992 and is currently an exhibiting fine art photographer. His work has been shown and awarded in several Texas and national exhibitions. Along with his passion for art is his passion for teaching. He taught high school art and photography for ten years and now teaches and leads workshops at Fort Worth Camera. With influences from his late father and his photo professor, Keith Carter, he continues to find interesting light on interesting subjects.

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Suzanne Morgan

Suzanne Morgan is passionate about fiber arts and creating in general. She has been fiber arts chair and workshop chair for the Craft Guild of Dallas, as well as an instructor for the Creative Arts Center of Dallas. These venues as well as frequent teaching at the Southeastern Animal and Fiber Fair in Asheville, North Carolina have given her the chance to teach many fiber arts workshops. Honors include publication in Fiber Art Now magazine in 2017, being a Dharma Featured Artist, representing the Creative Arts Center on Good Morning Texas, being a featured instructor in D Magazine, and recently participating in an instructor’s show at the Creative Arts Center entitled Process to Product. Suzanne has been programs chair and Vice-President of the Dallas Area Fiber Arts group, and recently judged their annual show. She discovered nuno felting about ten years ago, and has been passionately felting ever since. She is a firm believer that creativity heals, and encourages students to always play and follow their hearts.

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Carol Moseley

Carol Moseley has worked as an art teacher in middle and high school for 20 years. She has a BFA in Art Education and a MFA in Textile Design. Her work has been exhibited numerous times, including six times at Convergence, and in many state conferences. She received Best of Show at Fabric of Our Cultures. Her skill areas include weaving, knitting, crochet, needlepoint, kumihimo, felting and fulling, as well as extensive bead work. She is now happily retired from public school teaching, giving her more time to pursue her own work. She maintains active memberships in CHH, CHT, and HGA. She specializes in wearable art garments and makes a lot of costume jewelry.

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Ellen Smith

Ellen Smith grew up around looms and yarn. Her grandmother was an accomplished weaver with a house full of looms. Her mother is an active and accomplished weaver as well. Ellen weaves on the 12- shaft Macomber loom that her grandmother used for many years. Ellen has worked as a judge in children’s court for over 20 years, and she looks forward to retirement and a second career as a bohemian artist. She currently is interested in rug weaving, and she received the “Weaving for Home” Award of Excellence from Handwoven magazine in 2015 for one of her rugs. She lives in Fort Worth in a house full of looms with her husband and an energetic English Pointer pup.

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Mickey Stam

Mickey Stam earned a MA in the History of Decorative Arts with a textile focus before retiring as an information technology (IT) professional. She was awarded the Certificate of Excellence in Weaving from the Handweavers Guild of America in 2014. Experience in technical writing, training in IT users and group facilitation, along with skills in weaving, spinning, and dyeing, merged into her book, Innovative Weaving: A Guide for Study Groups, 2016.

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Polly Adams Sutton — Saturday Night Speaker

Polly Adams Sutton is a full-time studio artist, working with cedar bark to create sculptural baskets. Her educational background was in art, with an emphasis on painting and printmaking. Upon settling in the Pacific Northwest more than 30 years ago, she was introduced to basketry through the Seattle Weavers Guild. She harvests cedar bark each spring in logging areas near Seattle, Washington. Her sculptural work is primarily twined with wire over cedar bark. Sutton received an Artist Trust GAP grant in 2012. This was used in conjunction with the Seattle Weavers Guild Grant for investigating the basketry of Sardinia. Her work was chosen for the cover of the book 500 Baskets, and most recently, her sculptural basket traveled with the National Basketry show, Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in Americawww.pollyadamssutton.com

Dinner Speech:  “Baskets of Sardinia”

  • Saturday, June 1 – 5:30 pm

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Susie Taylor — Keynote Speaker

Susie Taylor has been weaving for over 30 years, primarily on shaft looms, and she has twelve years’ experience designing high-end, jacquard upholstery fabrics. She spent many years exploring hand manipulation techniques to
produce multi-layered structures and in 2012, she received the HGACertificate of Excellence in Handweaving, Level 1. That experience really broadened her skills and understanding of loom controlled structures. Now she finds great potential in combining loom controlled structures with hand manipulation. Today, she is an award-winning artist, creating dimensional textiles that incorporate origami and weaving together. She also works as a freelance designer for the commercial upholstery market.

Read more about Susie at her website: Weaving Origami

Keynote Speech: “Building on Tradition”

  • Friday, May 31 – 6:00 pm

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Eileen Thompson

Eileen Thompson is continually fascinated by the many and various ways people have found to work with threads. She has been spinning and weaving for over 30 years. Eileen originally taught herself ply-splitting from a Linda Hendrickson kit and has since taken workshops from Linda Hendrickson and Julie Hedges, and attended two international meetings of the BRAID Society.

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Download the Full Conference Registration Booklet:
CHT 2019 Registration Booklet

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